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The Role of Raman Spectroscopy in the QA/QC Laboratory

The role of the modern QA/QC laboratory has evolved into one where problems of almost any type are encountered. Product analysis is conducted using a variety of scientific instrumentation, some destructive and some not. Specificity and sensitivity are key elements of any analytical tool to be employed in this environment.
This webinar took place on January 16th 2019

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Raman webinar

Overview

The role of the modern QA/QC laboratory has evolved into one where problems of almost any type are encountered. Product analysis is conducted using a variety of scientific instrumentation, some destructive and some not. Specificity and sensitivity are key elements of any analytical tool to be employed in this environment. In this webcast, we will discuss the role Raman micro- and macro-spectroscopy can play in simplifying and streamlining the analysis of products and packaging will be discussed. Additionally, the usefulness of Raman spectroscopy will be reviewed for the identification of product defects due to foreign body inclusions, content defects, or deviations from expected content uniformity. Specific topics we will cover include:

  • Raman and regulatory compliance
  • Where does Raman fit in the QA/QC laboratory?
  • Characterizing unknown foreign bodies in product
  • Assessing product quality assurance quickly and easily

Key Learning Objectives

  • Learn how Raman spectroscopy can be seamlessly added to your compliant QA/QC laboratory
  • Learn the value of Raman for identifying unknown objects non-invasively
  • Learn how content uniformity and component distribution can be readily characterized

Who should attend ?

  • QA/QC analyst in polymers, pharmaceutical, forensic, and materials–based industries

Speaker

Dr. Tom Tague
Dr. Tom Tague
Applications Manager and Chair of the Safety Committee Bruker Corporation
Dr. Tom Tague is the Applications Manager (FTIR and Raman products) and Chair of the Safety Committee for Bruker Corporation. He is also a member of the Visiting Advisory Committee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Advisory Board of Amplified Sciences. Dr. Tague received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah in Physical Chemistry and his B.S. in Chemistry, from the University of Texas at San Antonio. He conducted his postdoctoral research at the University of Virginia working with professor Lester Andrews. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the Society for Applied Spectroscopy, the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. Dr. Tague is active in developing new methods and instrumentation with the goal of improving the sensitivity and detection limits of spectroscopy related applications. Dr. Tague has more than 80 publications and 5 patents.