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Experiments Performed with Efree Probes

Dedicated High-End Technologies for BioSolids and Materials

A Large numbers of proteins are not amenable to X-ray crystallography or liquid state NMR because:

  • Especially membrane proteins

  • Solubility poor or impossible

  • Crystallization impossible or insufficient for X-ray

There is a rapid method development by increasing number of groups to adapt solution strategies to solids. In parallel the increased customer interest has led to a wide range of well-established methods and pulse programs  available via the Bruker BioSpin pulse program library. This allows allowing novice researcher to enter the field of biological solid state NMR.

700 MHz HCN CPMAS

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GB1 project on Efree 4 mm 700 MHz HCN CPMAS probe. Experiments performed at and above room temperature. Resolution as found through isoleucine resonances better than 15 Hz. Sample courtesy of Vladimir Ladhizansky (U. Guelph).
700 MHz HCN CPMAS
GB1 project on Efree 4 mm 700 MHz HCN CPMAS probe. Experiments performed at and above room temperature. Resolution as found through isoleucine resonances better than 15 Hz. Sample courtesy of Vladimir Ladhizansky (U. Guelph).

700 MHz HCN CPMAS

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GB1 project on Efree 4 mm 700 MHz HCN CPMAS probe. Experiments performed at and above room temperature. Resolution as found through isoleucine resonances better than 15 Hz. Sample courtesy of Vladimir Ladhizansky (U. Guelph).
700 MHz HCN CPMAS
GB1 project on Efree 4 mm 700 MHz HCN CPMAS probe. Experiments performed at and above room temperature. Resolution as found through isoleucine resonances better than 15 Hz. Sample courtesy of Vladimir Ladhizansky (U. Guelph).

Static

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750 MHz Efree SAMMY spectrum of 2 mM <sup>15</sup>N-uniformly labeled Vpu in 14-O-PC/6-O-PC bicelles. Spectrum courtesy of S. Opella, UCSD.
Static
700 MHz Efree PISEMA spectrum of KdpF: 30 residue protein from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, in oriented membranes. Sample courtesy of T. Cross NHMFL.