Innova-IRIS_527x245.png
IRIS-TERS-probe2_527x245.png
AFM-Raman-Colocated.png

Co-Located AFM-Raman

The highly complementary nature of the information provided by AFM and Raman spectroscopy makes their combination especially intriguing.

The highly complementary nature of the information provided by AFM and Raman spectroscopy makes their combination especially intriguing. AFM excels at providing highest spatial resolution (even atomic resolution) surface structure, nanomechanical information (adhesion, stiffness), as well as nanoscale electrical property maps including electric field gradients, workfunction, conductivity with modes such as EFM, KPFM, and conductive AFM. On the other hand, the vibrational spectroscopic signature revealed in a Raman spectrum provides a means to detect the presence and orientation of chemical bonds and therefore create chemical maps. Co-located AFM-Raman studies can thus provide correlated information for pinpointing nanoscale chemistry-property relationships in chemically heterogeneous samples ranging from inorganic to polymers.

Back
AFM-Raman-TERS-research.png

TERS Research

As it holds the promise of nanoscale chemical mapping, the development of Tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is an active area of research.

As it holds the promise of nanoscale chemical mapping, the development of Tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is an active area of research. Based on utilizing a plasmonics structure as near field antenna, TERS necessitates specialized tips. The small signals generated by the small sampling volumes require AFM optical access optimized for near field coupling (i.e. side access for opaque samples, bottom access for transparent samples) as well as an ultra stable AFM platform to accommodate Raman integration times and preserve the tip. Designed for optimized integration with leading Raman systems, Bruker’s IRIS AFMs have been used for TERS studies on nanoscrystals, biomolecules, and thin molecular films.

Back
AFM-Raman-carbon.png

Carbon Elemental Allotropes

Ever since the discovery of carbon nanotubes and graphene, their unusual electrical properties and electronic structure has captured the imagination of researchers.

Ever since the discovery of carbon nanotubes and graphene, their unusual electrical properties and electronic structure has captured the imagination of researchers. AFM-Raman studies provide the ability to address individual carbon nanotubes and graphene flakes, precisely identifying structural parameters such as number of graphene layers. They enable the correlation of graphene electronic structure revealed in the Raman G (graphite) and D/2D (defect) bands with nanoscale mechanical (e.g. stiffness) and electrical (e.g. workfunction) variations – addressing questions of property tunability for device applications and sensitivity to electrical and chemical environment relevant also to potential sensing applications.

Back
AFM-Raman-materials.png

Materials Research

When nanoscale structure plays a key role in governing relevant material properties, the most powerful characterization may be a combined mapping of nanoscale structure, properties, and chemistry, correlating information provided by confocal Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), and advanced AFM modes such as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM).

When nanoscale structure plays a key role in governing relevant material properties, the most powerful characterization may be a combined mapping of nanoscale structure, properties, and chemistry, correlating information provided by confocal Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), and advanced AFM modes such as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Material research applications of such correlated studies include studies of microphase structure in polymers with end applications ranging from structural material to bulk heterojunction OPVs, the relation of electronic structure and properties to defects and chemical environment in graphene, crystallography and optical properties of nanocrystals, and thin molecular layers at interfaces.

Back
Related Information