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Tuesday, October 19 | 9AM PDT | 12PM EDT | 6PM GMT+1

Two- and Three-Photon Imaging of Neurovascular Coupling Across Neocortical Layers

presented by Prakash Kara, Ph.D., Professor of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota

Join this webinar to learn how two- and three-photon imaging can be optimized and used to study sensory stimulus selectivity and neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  • Discover recent, cutting-edge applications of two-photon and three-photon imaging, specifically in the study of individual blood vessels and related sensory stimuli.
  • Gain new insight into the scope of research opportunities enabled by the successful investigation of blood vessels in the white matter, below the neocortex, with multiphoton imaging.
  • Hear about recent multiphoton research focused on the neural correlates of hemodynamic responses and the spatial limits of neurovascular coupling in the neocortex.

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Presenter's Abstract


The brain has a mechanism for increasing blood flow locally to regions with increased neural activity. This increase in blood flow generates signals that can be measured when using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the precise spatial scale over which neural and vascular signals are correlated is largely unknown. This is of particular importance in the neocortex where lateral and laminar circuits are distinctly organized within and across mammalian species. While previous work has focused on molecular mechanisms of signaling between neurons and blood vessels, the extent to which individual blood vessels are locally ‘tuned’ for different categories of sensory stimuli was not examined until a recent study from my laboratory. We have been using two-photon and three-photon imaging in rodent and non-rodent mammals to measure sensory-evoked responses of individual blood vessels (dilation, blood velocity) while imaging neural activity in the surrounding tissue using fluorescent glutamate and calcium sensors. More recently, we have also been imaging blood vessels in the white matter, below the neocortex. In my Bruker Webinar, I will present multi-photon data which begin to address the neural correlates of hemodynamic responses and the spatial limits of neurovascular coupling in the neocortex. 

More details on this research are available at Dr. Kara's lab website:

Guest Speaker

Prakash Kara, Ph.D., Professor of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota