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On-Demand Session | 20 Minutes

Biology at the Nanoscale: From Viruses to Amyloids

presented by Dmitry Kurouski, Ph.D. (Texas A&M University)

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Watch this exclusive presentation by Dmitry Kurouski, Ph.D. (Texas A&M University) about the complementary use of TERS and AFM-IR to investigate biological samples. Submit the form for instant, full-length access.

 

Explore recent leading-edge research using nanoscale infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) in the characterization of viruses and other biological samples.

  • Gain new insight into the ways that nanoIR—and AFM-IR, specifically—overcomes the limits of traditional biological imaging methods.
  • Understand how to synthesize complementary information provided by TERS and AFM-IR in the study of viruses and other biological samples.
  • Learn how AFM-IR and TERS together reveal new information about the composition, surface structure, and secondary structures of biological samples.
  • Review detailed real-world research findings related to viruses, viral particles, and alpha-synuclein oligomers.

 

 

 

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Explore the benefits of the complementary use of TERS and AFM-IR to investigate biological samples.

In this presentation, Dmitry Kurouski, Ph.D. (Texas A&M University) showcases his team's research and findings using TERS and AFM-IR to investigate viruses, viral particles, and alpha-synuclein oligomers. Presentation topics range from an exploration of how IR/nanoIR spectroscopy reveals a variety of infrared spectra in biological samples that are otherwise inaccessible by traditional raman microscopy methods, to a detailed discussion of the changes observed via a combination of AFM-IR and TERS in the secondary structural organization and surface structure information of populations of oligomers relative to their impact on the development of Parkinson's disease.

This illustrates that neither AFM-IR nor TERS is "better" than the other for the study of biological samples; rather, these two technologies possess different capabilities that demonstrate strong complementarity in terms of both the chemical information available and the achievable probing depth.