Atomic Force Microscopy Webinars

Application of Atomic Force Microscopy in the Study of Semiconductor Materials and Devices

In this webinar, we highlight how Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can assist in nanometer scale characterization of semiconductor materials and devices.

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In this webinar, Application of Atomic Force Microscopy in the Study of Semiconductor Materials and Devices, our speakers highlight how Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can assist in nanometer scale characterization of semiconductor materials and devices.

The high-resolution imaging capability of AFM is augmented by the possibility to simultaneously measure electrical, mechanical and thermal properties, with the same nanometer scale resolution. Consequently, particular attention is given to electrical characterization, including carrier profiling inside devices, conductivity mapping on dielectrics, and failure analysis of devices.

Learn About Advances in AFM for Semiconductor Applications

In this webinar, we take a closer look at the capability to perform high-resolution imaging of surface topography. A few typical applications are covered:

  1. Roughness characterization of bare wafers and thin films
  2. CMP characterization including roughness, dishing and erosion
  3. Inspection of nanoscale defects
  4. Critical dimension metrology of lines, trenches, holes and other nanoscale structures such as CMOS imaging sensor micro lenses and LED patterned sapphire substrate dome structures

Practical aspects such as tip selection, tip shape monitoring and tip lifetime, throughput, automation and extraction of critical analysis parameters are also discussed.

Finally, we focus on the capability to apply AFM for local chemical identification by combining it with nanoscale IR imaging and spectroscopy. Two interesting applications of this ‘AFM-IR’ approach are the chemical identification of contaminants and chemical mapping (with 10 nm spatial resolution) of specific materials.

 

Presentation Date: December 16, 2020

Speakers

Dr. Peter De Wolf

Worldwide Director of Applications, Bruker

Peter De Wolf received his Ph.D in Electrical Engineering from the University Leuven, Belgium in 1998. His PhD work focused on the development of SPM based electrical characterization methods for semiconductors at IMEC in Belgium. He is co-inventor of several SPM methods & holder of several patents. Since 1998, Peter De Wolf works at Bruker (formerly Digital Instruments & Veeco Instruments) in both Santa Barbara, USA and Paris, France. At Bruker he held positions as R&D engineer and application development scientist and contributed in the development of electrical SPM methods including SSRM, TUNA, SCM, and DataCube methods. Currently, he is Worldwide Director of Applications – leading an international team of experts in SPM with laboratories located in Europe, USA, Asia and Japan, covering a broad range of SPM applications and operating modes

Dr. Ingo Schmitz
Technical Marketing Engineer, Bruker